• General Plan of the Royal Castle in Warsaw with the Project of Transformation and Development of this Castle, Gardens and its Surroundings. Plate B

    Artist:
    Kubicki, Jakub. 1758-1833
    Dimensions:
    59,8х47,7 cm

Kubicki, Jakub. 1758-1833

General Plan of the Royal Castle in Warsaw with the Project of Transformation and Development of this Castle, Gardens and its Surroundings. Plate B

Poland, circa 1818

Title:

General Plan of the Royal Castle in Warsaw with the Project of Transformation and Development of this Castle, Gardens and its Surroundings. Plate B

Place:

Date:

Material:

Dimensions:

59,8х47,7 cm

Acquisition date:

Transferred to the Hermitage from the Stroganov Palace Library through the Museum Fund

Inventory Number:

ОР-44935

Comment:

An interest in developing the territory around the Royal Castle first arose in the reign of August II who in 1713 ordered the Warsaw City Council to entrust architects with the task of developing the concept of the castle reconstruction. In 1741–1746 Gaetano Chiaveri oversaw the construction of the Saxon wing. Jakub Fontana worked on the project in the 1760s, while Jan Chrystian Kamsetzer supervised the construction in the 1770–1780s. In 1778–1779 Domenico Merlini and William Henry Minter offered their own versions of expansion. However, of paramount importance for the land improvement at the foot of the castle was the project designed around 1818 by the then Geneгal Royal Commissary in charge of the project, Head of the Construction Committee, Jakub Kubicki. The axis of the new square in the form of an elongated hexagon was expected to coincide with the location of the Sigismund Column. In order to achieve a symmetry developed by Kubicki, it was suggested to put up a similar commemorative column near the square exit leading to to Ivan Kupala Street. Kubicki suggested expanding the castle front on the side of the square, designed a terrace on the basis of ten large arcades and doubled the garden area. The design for the garden was in the form of a nine beam network of alleys with axes radiating from the central part of the ensemble by analogy with the three-beam system of the Versailles. Evaluating the project, it can be said that Kubicki faithfully followed the traditions of the 18th century. His classicism was not free from Baroque features, which are most pronounced in the composition of Zamkovaya Square and the garden layout. The architect sought to achieve the symmetry of the ensemble on the side of the Vistula and also strove to include the upper gardens in the architectural framing of the arcades. The construction was conducted in 1818–1825. Comments by Valery Shevchenko

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